California Conservation Genomics Program – Species Nominations Now Open

09.25.19

The California Conservation Genomics Project (CCGP) is a $10 million state-funded initiative involving conservation biologists, geneticists, ecologists and climate scientists from all 10 University of California campuses, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, the UC Natural Reserve System and California State University campuses, as well as officials from state and federal regulatory agencies and non-government agencies, such as The Nature Conservancy.

The goal of the CCGP is to help California officials make ecologically wise decisions as the state continues to confront the effects of climate change. CCGP aims to provide decision-makers with current scientific data and analyses they can use to make decisions about conserving the state’s species and their habitats, better protect natural resources and create strategic plans to ensure that California’s people, places and wildlife are more resilient to climate change. The project will be based in the La Kretz Center and the UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability.

UC Davis has two CCGP representatives, Distinguished Professor Harris Lewin and Assistant Professor Rachel Bay, who are interested in hearing from faculty who wish to nominate a species to the program.  Nominations should focus on threatened and endangered species, iconic species, and species that are critical to California’s economy.  Faculty who have existing state-wide, population-level collections of organisms should contact Harris Lewin immediately because there is an opportunity to have these organisms included in a pilot study if there is sufficient high-quality DNA available or that can be extracted from the samples.

Please note that the project has been scaled back considerably from the $40 million originally requested.

Read more about the initiative here.

For more information or to nominate a species, please contact UC Davis’ CCGP representatives, Harris Lewin and Rachel Bay.