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Rapid Outcomes from Agricultural Research program funding

Rapid Outcomes from Agricultural Research (ROAR)

Sponsor: Foundation for Food and Agricultural Research (FFAR)

Limited Submissions: selection limit = 1

Sponsor Proposal Deadline: Monday, May 1st, 2017

Budget: $150,000 (required 1:1 cost-sharing = $300,000 total project costs)

Project Duration: 1 Year

For more information, please visit the program website: http://foundationfar.org/ROAR/

Contact: Dr. Tim Kurt, Scientific Program Director at tkurt@foundationfar.org, (202) 816-1884


The Rapid Outcomes from Agricultural Research (ROAR) program, created by FFAR, provides nimble deployment of funds to support research and outreach in response to emerging or unanticipated threats to the nation’s food supply or agricultural systems. ROAR participants, including but not limited to university researchers, farmers or producers, commodity groups and government officials, may apply for funds before an outbreak for development of diagnostics, monitoring and mitigation strategies, or enter into an agreement with FFAR that enables the quick release of funds should an outbreak occur. In this way, the ROAR program supports pre-outbreak efforts, and in the case of an outbreak, fills the gap until traditional, longer-term funding sources can be secured.

Up to $150,000 per one-year grant is available from FFAR, with the requirement that recipients provide equal or greater matching funds from non-U.S. federal sources.

ROAR is structured around self-organized consortia consisting of researchers, extension agents, institutions, commodity and industry representatives, diagnostic laboratories, and relevant state and local government representatives. These consortia (1) provide a network of experts to set research priorities in the case of an outbreak, (2) determine the most qualified teams to complete the work, (3) administer funding, (4) track progress and (5) manage communication around research progress and outcomes. For groups seeking support at the time of an outbreak, prior approval of the consortium through a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with FFAR allows the rapid deployment of funds should an outbreak occur. The consortium must designate a lead organization or official to enter into the MOA with FFAR.

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